Ep.52 NEW SOLAR ENERGY CELLS IN BETTER USE OF THE SUN
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"First on air 2 July 2022"

According to a study by Carbon Tracker, a London-based independent financial think tank that carries out in-depth analysis on the impact of energy transition, it was found that even with conservative estimation, we could harness up to 7,000 Petawatt-hours from solar energy, much more than enough to meet the entire global energy demand. To see how much these 7,000 Petawatt-hours is, let’s look at some of our global energy demands. In 2019, the total global demand for electricity was only 27 Petawatt-hours, a tiny fraction of what the sun could provide us. Even though solar energy clearly has the potential to be our new primary source of power, the global electricity supply generated from the solar as of 2019 was just 0.7 Petawatt-hours, or only 0.01 percent of our solar potential. Solar photovoltaic system, or solar PV, a technology to turn sunlight into electricity, is still not widely applied in hot tropical countries, partly because of its technological limitations that solar panels will have lower efficiency when operating under high temperature. However, a researcher team at Metallurgy and Materials Science Research Institute of Chulalongkorn University has tried to develop a new type of solar PV, known as perovskite solar cells, in tackling the limitations of traditional solar panels. Guests in this episode are Teerapong Sanglarpcharoenkit, urban revolution coordinator of Greenpeace Thailand, and Dr. Rongrong Cheacharoen, a researcher of Metallurgy and Materials Science Research Institute, Chulalongkorn University.